Fragrance Friday: Nirmal

Fragrance Friday: Nirmal

I love a fragrance that is both lovely to smell and intriguing to consider. I also love floral fragrances, although I am branching out as I learn more about perfume. Laboratorio Olfattivo Nirmal is all three. I have previously declared my love for that house’s Decou-Vert Nirmal is a new love, though I don’t see myself wearing it more than Decou-Vert, generally speaking — maybe in the fall, when I don’t crave the green notes of my beloved muguets.

The firm’s website describes it in terms of soft white fabric brushing against skin, sweetness, serenity, tranquility, a cloud of white notes. The top note is carrot, followed by heart notes of iris root and violet, drying down to a base of sweet suede, cedar and amber. The name is a Hindi or Sanskrit first name for boys, which means pure, innocent, tranquil. And yes, this is a fragrance that could easily be worn by a man. The iris note is really orris root, the violet is very hushed and the sweet notes in the base are well-balanced with the cedar.

The carrot top note is very clear and leaves no doubt that it is carrot. It is a fresh carrot, though, the kind one might buy at a farmer’s market, with its ferny green foliage intact as well as its fresh-from-the-earth sweetness, that vanishes before carrots reach the supermarket. The carrot slowly gives way to iris root, the two merging imperceptibly until you notice at some point that the carrot is gone and the iris has taken over, with a blush of violet. Then the iris slowly yields to the violet, and the undertones of cedar, “daim” and amber begin to appear softly.

Olfactoria’s Travels had a lovely review of Nirmal two years ago; the author did not perceive the carrot as strongly as I did, and she sensed the sweet “daim” notes more strongly, although they do get stronger and more candied as Nirmal dries down. She made a lovely comparison between Nirmal and the lone white iris in one of Van Gogh’s most famous paintings, noting that like the white iris, this scent is pale and delicate.

Oil painting of iris flowers with lone white iris, by Vincent van Gogh

Irises, by Vincent van Gogh

I agree — there are no grape notes, as one finds in some iris flowers; the only purplish fragrance note is the faint flush of violet, and maybe that’s a white violet, too.

white-violet

Sweet white violet

Nirmal has good longevity on my skin; five hours or more. I would say that its sillage is moderate. As it dries down, the sweet “daim” notes do become stronger, but they are never cloying or too sugary. There is a warmth to the sweetness that probably comes from the amber note, and a nice balance from the light but woody cedar. After eight hours, most of what I still smell is the amber, which has come shyly out of the background to outlast the other notes.

I will be interested to try this next summer, when the weather is hot, to see how it fares. Right now, my favorite fragrances for the kind of hot, humid weather we get in the South are Ellena’s Un Jardin Sur le Nil and Un Jardin Apres La Mousson Right now, the weather is cool and overcast but not chilly, and Nirmal feels just right.

 

Small Business Saturday: PK Perfumes

Today has been christened “Small Business Saturday” in the retail world: a day during the long Thanksgiving weekend when shoppers can support local and small businesses. So I happily used a discount code to make my first purchase from PK Perfumes, a small independent niche perfumery. If you want to do likewise, the code is: PKFRIDAY40, for 40% off this whole weekend, on the whole website.

Fragrance Friday: Daily Post -“Aromatic”

Fragrance Friday: Daily Post -“Aromatic”

I don’t normally do the WordPress “Daily Post”, but one of this week’s word prompts caught my eye: “aromatic.” Well, I certainly have a response to that, as some of my favorite fragrances have aromatic qualities, even if they aren’t primarily classified as “aromatics”. But let’s start with a classic: the aptly named “Aromatics Elixir” by Clinique.

In many ways, Aromatics Elixir is a quintessential 1970s fragrance. It was launched at the start of that decade, created by the great perfumer Bernard Chant, for a new brand (Clinique) of the Estee Lauder company. It is green, dry, herbal and strong. Its creators positioned it as a “non-conformist chypre”, a perfume ahead of its time, that went “beyond perfume.” To me, it is in many ways the scent of 1970s feminism: independent, strong, challenging traditional strictures without becoming androgynous. Very in-your-face and unapologetic, but with its own beauty. If I were to assign a face to it, I would choose 1970s supermodel Lauren Hutton, a non-conformist beauty with her gap teeth and American style. Hutton had a chameleon-like quality, able to pull off effortless elegance in couture evening wear but showing off that same great bone structure in a plain white shirt, outdoors in the fresh air. Whenever I picture her in my mind, she is outside.

Supermodel Lauren Hutton in 1975

Lauren Hutton, 1975

Luca Turin describes the impact of Aromatics Elixir thus: “Smelling Aromatics Elixir on a strip and especially in the air following a string of ‘modern’ fragrances is like watching Lauren Bacall in The Big Sleep after twelve episodes of Cheers.” That pretty much sums it up; as he notes, Aromatics Elixir “achieves at once salubrious radiance and luxurious dusk.”

But Bernard Chant created another great aromatic fragrance for Estee Lauder, shortly before Aromatics Elixir: 1969’s Azuree. I was lucky enough to find an affordable, unopened tester of Azuree parfum online – wow. This is a really complex fragrance with a lot of different notes balanced against each other. Luca Turin calls it a “citrus leather” with a leather-chypre heart and gives it five stars, contrasting its ongoing fidelity to the original vision of its creator with the sad dismantling of his other leathery masterpiece, Cabochard. Fragrantica lists its notes as follows: top notes – aldehydes, artemisia, gardenia, basil, sage, bergamot; middle notes – cyclamen, orris root, jasmine, ylang-ylang, geranium, vetiver, rose; base notes – leather, amber, patchouli, musk and oakmoss. My bottle is labeled as “parfum”, not “eau de parfum”, and both its strength and longevity bear that out, as does the slightly oily slick on my skin when I first spray it on. Other commenters have noted the excellent spray nozzle on this bottle, which allows you to spray a small amount in fine droplets. That is all you need! Azuree is strong stuff!

On my skin, Azuree opens with a jolt of aldehydes, bergamot and artemisia, with herbal tones from the basil and sage top notes, although I can’t distinguish those separately.  In the middle stage, I mostly smell orris root (really delightful and earthy, with an underlying carroty sweetness), vetiver and a hint of ylang-ylang. The story behind Azuree is that Estee Lauder, founder of the cosmetics empire, wanted to capture the outdoor scents of Cap d’Antibes on the azure sea of the French Riviera, where she had a villa in the years when Cap d’Antibes still looked more like the landscapes painted by Claude Monet and other Impressionists than the overbuilt hodge-podge it has become. Azuree does have a Mediterranean aura of dryness, citrus, herbs, and pine resin, as if one were looking down a dry Riviera coastline toward the stone pines of Juan-les-Pins from a sunlit Mediterranean garden. While roses, cyclamens and geraniums are listed among the heart notes, and they are all Mediterranean flowers that might grow in such a garden, along with the green herbs listed among the top notes, I really can’t pick them out.

View of the cliff garden, sea and boats, from garden of villa in French Riviera

View from villa in the French Riviera

As it dries down, Azuree becomes more leathery, dry and oak-mossy. At this stage, it LASTS.  If I put it on my wrists at night, I can still clearly smell its final drydown stage the next morning. Like Aromatics Elixir, this fragrance is so very different from the current trends of sweet, fruity or gourmand scents! It doesn’t smell old-fashioned at all, it smells almost radical. Yet at the same time, if one were to characterize it as a person, one might describe a free-spirited young woman, wearing no make up but with an “old soul” gazing from her eyes. Definitely one of the great beauties of the 1970s. If Aromatics Elixir is Lauren Hutton, Azuree is Margaux Hemingway, whose grandfather famously spent so much time on the unspoilt Riviera with the most glamorous, unconventional creatives of the day.

Supermodel Margaux Hemingway

Margaux Hemingway

Seeking Serenity: Black Friday Sale — Trish Burr Embroidery

Hello everyone I have some news! Firstly I am delighted to announce the opening of the new DIGITAL SHOP on Etsy as of today 24th November 2016. The shop can be found here: ETSY DIGITAL SHOP. SALE: Secondly in keeping with the BLACK FRIDAY sales worldwide tomorrow there will be 50% off all downloads for […]

via Black Friday Sale — Trish Burr Embroidery

I’m thinking that some new embroidery projects might help restore a little serenity, after this horrible election season here in the U.S.. I have long wanted to try one of Trish Burr’s needlepainting designs and I just love her new pattern with the little red cardinal. So I’m looking forward to her new Etsy shop and her Black Friday sale! Something to look forward to, after today’s anticipated cooking marathon for Thanksgiving!

Fragrance Friday: Shampure

This past week, I have needed “comfort smells.” To be honest, the American Presidential election and its outcome were shocking to me and I am downcast, to say the least. I have had trouble sleeping and it took several days for me to stop waking up in the morning thinking the whole thing had been a bad dream. I also had a nasty little virus that stuffed up my nose and kept me coughing uncontrollably. I needed aromatherapy!

And something that I have found comforting is Shampure Composition Oil, made by Aveda. Aveda’s website describes it as a blend of sunflower and meadowfoam oils with 25 different plant and flower essences. It can be used as a massage oil for body and scalp, moisturizer, bath oil, etc. and, in the website’s words: it “calms the senses with an aroma with 25 pure flower and plant essences including certified organic lavender, petitgrain and ylang ylang.” That sounded promising, and I have a small one-ounce bottle of it from the local Aveda boutique, as a birthday freebie.

I have been rubbing it onto the back of my hands when I go to bed, so I can smell it while I read before I sleep. The scent is a pleasant blend of herbal, floral and lightly spicy notes. MakeUp Alley says that some of the 25 essential oils are: Rose, Lavender, Aloe, Rosemary, Orange, Eucalyptus, Patchouli, Ylang Ylang, Anise, Fennel, Licorice, Bergamot, Coriander, Peppermint, Petitgrain, Vanilla. The ones I smell the most, in no particular order, are probably the aloe, eucalyptus, orange, ylang ylang, peppermint, petitgrain and rosemary. It reminds me of Miller Harris’ La Pluie, which shares several of its aromatic notes.

And yes, I am finding its fragrance very soothing at bedtime. I do like to wear fragrance at night sometimes, but it can be challenging to find one that is calming enough to support sleep. The scent of Shampure also wafts up nicely from the back of my hands if I’m up reading, and it is close but not too close when I finally turn out the lights and try to sleep. Added bonus: the oil feels great on my skin and my hands are benefiting from the moisture!

So that’s my current regime of election aftermath aromatherapy. I’m sure I’ll be ready for more resilient fragrances soon, suitable for the long period of resistance I foresee ahead. Something, perhaps, by Boadicea the Victorious.

Queen Boadicea of the Britons, warrior leader against Roman occupation of Britain

Boadicea, Warrior Queen

Image from the Brooklyn Museum.

Fragrance Friday: ?

Fragrance Friday: ?

Usually I post something about fragrance on Fridays here, on the blog I began to remind myself of the many things that make me happy, which is why I called it “Serenity Now.” But this election week, I have no words.  What shall I describe? The scent of despair? The scent of disgust? Our President-elect exemplifies all the behaviors I abhor most: cruelty, greed, mendacity, cowardice, avarice, infidelity … the list goes on and on. I’ll try to post something fragrant later this weekend when I regain some composure, and maybe some serenity.

Image: DarkMedia

Fragrance Friday: Lumiere Blanche

Fragrance Friday: Lumiere Blanche

While traveling in the UK and Ireland (Perfume Tourism: I’m Ba-a-a-ack!) this summer and fall, I was given a sample of Lumiere Blanche by the delightful sales associate at Parfumarija in Dublin, with my purchase of the Ormonde Jayne discovery set. I haven’t opened it until now, but since I bought the Olfactive Studio discovery kit at the London independent niche perfumery Bloom, I have started exploring that brand and thought it was time.

Bloom independent niche perfumery in London

Bloom

And yes, it’s time — because Lumiere Blanche is an ideal scent for the kind of dry, sunny fall we are having in my part of the world.  Its top notes are: cardamom, cinnamon and star anise; middle notes are iris, cashmere wood and almond milk; base notes are musk, sandalwood, cedar and tonka bean. In other words, it smells a lot like milky masala chai tea, something I love.

Chai teas spices with star anise, cardamom, cinnamon

Chai tea spices; thecheapluxury.com

Luckily for me, it is light on the cinnamon. I love cinnamon, but I don’t want to smell like a cinnamon broom (I’m looking at you, Dasein Autumn!). Lumiere Blanche reminds me a bit of Carner Barcelona’s Palo Santobut lighter. At first spray, I get a delightful waft of cardamom, a spice I love, with a tinge of star anise, warmed by just a hint of cinnamon. The overall effect is milky, too, which I attribute to the almond and tonka bean notes. Those are definitely present throughout, from start to finish. Very quickly, I also smell the woody notes, mostly sandalwood and cedar, but the “cashmere wood” adds, I think, to the soft, milky impression. After a little more time, the iris note emerges, but lightly. It really adds nuance and depth to the progression, with its rooty, earthy, but sweet floral scent. I am enjoying its contribution to Lumiere Blanche, and its addition to the spices and wood notes is an unusual, creative combination that works.

Lumiere Blanche is a soft fragrance overall. On my skin, it is really lovely and I could see wearing this a lot during the fall. It is not as strong as Palo Santo and would probably, therefore, work better than it as an office scent. Olfactive Studio’s website says:

Lumiere Blanche is a comforting cocoon, between milky mildness and cold spices. It evokes the sweltering heat of a sun at its zenith, which erases colors, leaving only a blinding white, and surprised by its spicy freshness.

For the perfumer, [it] is “A cold-hot accord for a perfume of contrasts,” a bright and fresh surge and a creamy softness and a strong signature, warm and sensual.

I don’t perceive this as a scent of “sweltering heat” or “blinding white” light. It is definitely a sunny scent, though neither citrusy nor green, notes which are sometimes associated with sunniness in fragrances (probably why the name emphasizes white, versus yellow or green). For these long, unseasonably warm, sunny autumn days in my part of the world, it is just right.