Perfume Chat Room, September 23

Perfume Chat Room, September 23

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, September 23, and I am planning a trip to Las Vegas! My husband is going for work, and I will go with him. Vegas isn’t really my scene, and I’ve only been there once before, but I’m really looking forward to it — for three reasons. One, spending several days in a nice hotel with my nice husband is a treat in itself. Two, we have tickets to see the Cirque du Soleil show The Beatles Love, which we saw on my only prior trip and thought was fabulous. Three, I plan to visit the Guerlain boutique, which I’ve never done before!

Poster for the Cirque du Soleil show "The Beatles Love"
The Beatles Love; Cirque du Soleil.

One my last trip to Las Vegas, I hadn’t yet gone down the perfume rabbit-hole, so Guerlain wasn’t on my must-see list. When I did get interested in Guerlain fragrances, I used to be able to try them at a Guerlain counter at nearby department stores, but then Guerlain closed those. I’ve visited mini-boutiques in duty-free areas of airports. But this will be my first visit to an actual Guerlain Boutique, and I’ve heard that some of the new versions of the classic fragrances are big improvements over the prior reformulations.

So, fragrance friends, what do you recommend I try, and possibly buy??

Perfume Chat Room, September 16

Perfume Chat Room, September 16

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, September 16, and the weather has finally broken in my part of the world, meaning that we are finally getting cooler nights and less humid days. So I’ve been spending a lot of time in my garden, cleaning up the weedy mess it had become during July and August, when it really was too unpleasant to spend much time outside. We had so much rain this summer that the mosquitoes were just unbearable, no matter what I used for protection (including a fabulous coverup of hooded jacket and drawstring pants made entirely of mosquito netting!).

Anti-mosquito bug jacket, pants, and gloves

The rain also turbo-charged the weeds, which became jungle-like, and when it wasn’t raining, the humidity was almost intolerable, resulting in my being drenched in sweat after only minutes outside. Ugh!

The good part of all the rain was that the lavender and creeping rosemary I planted all along a new berm, that was created as part of a “dry creek” drainage system along the back of our house, have also flourished, and they smell wonderful! They also make the local pollinators very happy. I haven’t had much luck with lavender before, but this elevated berm in full sun is exactly what it likes and mimics the technique used in cultivated fields of lavender.

I used to think I didn’t care for lavender in fragrances, but my Jicky eau de toilette has converted me. I just love it (the EDT more than the eau de parfum, though both are beautiful). Do you have a favorite fragrance that features lavender?

Sprigs of lavender and rosemary
Lavender and rosemary; image by Cora Mueller for Getty Images
Perfume Chat Room, September 9

Perfume Chat Room, September 9

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, September 9, and the news is full of yesterday’s passing of Queen Elizabeth II, at the age of 96. There are many other places to debate the future of the monarchy, the British Empire’s impact, etc. This is not that place, as I know how widely opinions vary on those subjects. Today, I am focusing on Her late Majesty as a unique human being, who was born to privilege but also to lifelong service, including her unexpected ascension to the throne at the age of 25. At her birth, she was not expected to become the monarch but was thrust into the role of royal heir when her uncle abdicated, leaving her father to become King. He and her mother were models of duty and service — before, during and after World War II — and the young Elizabeth absorbed those lessons fully, performing official duties from her childhood until two days before her death, when she welcomed and appointed the UK’s new Prime Minister, Liz Truss. Extraordinary. (Ok, one political side note: I’m glad she lived long enough to see the changes in leadership in the USA and the UK, given the markedly poor manners of the two former leaders).

Full disclosure: I was raised by an English mother who, although she chose to leave England and its post-war constraints when she herself was in her early 20s, kept a high regard for Queen Elizabeth, her contemporary, and even identified with her as the older of two sisters, engrained with that sense of responsibility and duty. Her younger sister, my late aunt, had a personality more like Princess Margaret’s, but they were devoted to each other until my aunt’s early death from cancer in her 40s.

Bringing it back to fragrance, I’ve read that Queen Elizabeth’s favorite fragrances were Guerlain’s L’Heure Bleue and Floris’ White Rose. I haven’t tried the latter, but I have and love L’Heure Bleue. I also have a new fragrance that had already reminded me of Elizabeth, and will now be forever linked to her in my mind: Miller Harris’ Violet Ida. I received it earlier this month as a birthday gift, and it is lovely! As regular readers here know, Miller Harris is an English brand founded by London perfumer Lyn Harris. Violet Ida is actually based on iris and heliotrope, with top notes of bergamot and carrot seed, and base notes of vanilla and amber. It was inspired by the heroine of an English novel, whose name was Ida, whom the Miller Harris says “represents goodness, tenacity and morality.” That does seem appropriate for the late Queen as a person; and the pale violet color of Violet Ida‘s bottle evokes one of the pastel shades she favored in her public outfits.

Queen Elizabeth II in lavender
Her late Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

It always made me foolishly happy that the Queen had such a lovely meeting with the late rosarian David Austin, the year they both turned 90, at the Chelsea Flower Show and the display of his gorgeous English Roses, my favorites. I will think of this great lady when I wear Violet Ida. Rest in peace, Elizabeth, and may flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.

Queen Elizabeth II and David Austin at the Chelsea Flower Show
Scent Semantics, September 5

Scent Semantics, September 5

The word for this month’s Scent Semantics posts is “misanthrope.” If you haven’t read one of these posts before, “Scent Semantics” brings together a group of us fragrance bloggers in a collaborative project called “Scent Semantics“, the brainchild of Portia Turbo over at A Bottled Rose. On the first Monday of each month, we all take a word — the same word — as inspiration for a post that has some relationship to a fragrance, broadly interpreted. There are six participating blogs: Serenity Now Scents and Sensibilities (here), The Plum GirlThe Alembicated GenieEau La LaUndina’s Looking Glass, and A Bottled Rose. I hope you’ll all check out the Scent Semantics posts on each blog!

One definition of “misanthrope” is “someone who dislikes and avoids other people.” Now, I am not normally a misanthrope myself, although I am definitely an introvert (and if you’ve never seen author Susan Cain’s TED talk on the subject, click on that link — it’s a treat!). However, I think we’ve all become a bit misanthropic during the last two and a half years of a global pandemic — we were forced to avoid other people starting in March of 2020, then we disliked many people because of their varied responses to the pandemic. Layer on top of that the American elections of 2020 and their aftermath, so full of rage, and I think it’s safe to say that many of us, misanthropic by nature or not, have been slowly emerging from a phase of misanthropy.

My semantically matched fragrance this month is vintage Chanel No. 19 eau de toilette. I’ve been wearing it almost daily for the past week as my green armor at work, due to the difficulties I’ve encountered leading up to a long overdue personal leave (which started this weekend, yay!). No. 19 always makes me feel that I can be tougher than I actually am; it stiffens my backbone. Some might say that it helps me set and keep healthy boundaries, lol!

Why? I think it’s because of the hefty dose of galbanum that heralds its arrival: a bitter, green opening chord that announces, as the Chanel website says, a “daring, distinctive, uncompromising composition.” Perfect for setting boundaries! The other top notes reinforce the lack of compromise: astringent bergamot, assertive hyacinth, aromatic neroli. All have a distinctive tinge of green supporting the star of the show, the galbanum, which Fragrantica sums up as an “intense and persistent bitter green .” Indeed. If galbanum were a person, it would be Bette Davis playing Margo Channing in “All About Eve”:

“All About Eve”, 20th Century Fox.

If you’re not familiar with the movie, it is about a star actress who is turning forty, fears for her career, and is manipulated and ultimately upstaged by a much younger woman. Fittingly, No. 19 was the last Chanel fragrance created while Coco Chanel herself was still alive, in her 80s, though I don’t know that anyone ever succeeded in either manipulating or upstaging her. Master perfumer Henri Robert put the finishing touches on the formula in 1970, Chanel died in early 1971, and No. 19 was released the same year.

The blog “Olfactoria’s Travels” has a wonderful review of No. 19, referring to it as a “magic cloak”. The reviewer takes a more benevolent view of No. 19 than Tania Sanchez did in the guide to perfumes she co-wrote with Luca Turin, where she compared it to the wire mother monkey in a famous experiment about nurturing or the lack thereof. Blogger and author Neil Chapman, of “The Black Narcissus”, is famously a devotee of No. 19, scarfing up vintage bottles of it in all formats from second-hand stores in Japan, where he lives. You can read all about it in his amazing book, “Perfume: In Search of Your Signature Scent”, available in the UK and the US, and elsewhere in other languages, which I highly recommend!

Luckily for me, since I adore green fragrances, on my skin the greenery lasts and lasts, joined in the heart phase by some of my favorite floral notes: iris, orris root, rose, lily-of-the-valley, narcissus, jasmine and ylang-ylang. The green astringency of the opening notes is carried forward by the lily-of-the-valley and narcissus, while orris root adds earthiness, iris adds powder, and jasmine and ylang-ylang add airiness, sexiness and warmth. My sense of No. 19 as “armor” is aided by my vintage spray, a refillable, silvery, aluminum canister that has protected its contents for many years.

No. 19 has had many “faces”, my favorite being English model and iconoclast Jean Shrimpton. And guess what? Based on her own words, she may actually have been a misanthrope, having walked away from her superstar modeling career and life of celebrity in her 30s, becoming what she herself described as a recluse running a hotel in Cornwall. Although the photo of her below is not an ad for Chanel, to me it captures the spirit of No. 19‘s opening — inscrutable, distant, mingling shades of green, white, and earthy brown with the unexpected intrusion of purple:

Model Jean Shrimpton sitting on an ancient tree root.
Jean Shrimpton; image by Patrick Lichfield for Vogue, 1970.

As No. 19 dries down, to my nose the galbanum never leaves, though it recedes into the distance as the oakmoss enters the glade. Because I have the vintage EDT, the base includes oakmoss, leather, musk, sandalwood, and cedar. It is a true chypre, a genre I love. It reminds me of the Jackie Kennedy Onassis of the 1970s: elegant and even haughty upon first appearance, with a warmth that reveals itself over time to the patient; breaking free from the fashion conventions she mastered so skillfully and embodied in the 1950s and 1960s, and far from the cold “wire mother” of Tania Sanchez’ imagining while retaining an aura that commands respect.

I’m choosing to adopt Laura Bailey‘s interpretation of No. 19, which she described in Vogue at the height of pandemic lockdowns in 2020, as the scent of new beginnings and dreams of future adventure:

No 19, the ‘unexpected’ Chanel, the ‘outspoken’ Chanel, created at the height of the first wave of feminism in 1971, and named for Coco Chanel’s birthday – 19 August – is, for me, the fragrance of freedom, of optimism, of strength. (And of vintage campaign stars Ali MacGraw, Jean Shrimpton and Christie Brinkley.) The heady cocktail of rose-iris-vetiver-jasmine-lily-of-the-valley remains shockingly modern and original, bolder than any sweet fairy-tale fantasy.

If you had to relate a fragrance to the word “misanthrope”, which would you choose?

Ad with perfume bottle of Chanel No. 19
Chanel No. 19 ad; image from chanel.com.
Perfume Chat Room, Sept. 2

Perfume Chat Room, Sept. 2

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, September 2, and it is the start of the Labor Day weekend here in the US. It is also the start of a leave I am taking from my job, so yippee! I have some health challenges I need to address before they become dire, and that’s all I will say about that. I’ve been wearing Chanel No. 19 every workday this week, as I patiently explain (again) to my boss how everything will get done; and make it as easy as possible for my small team to actually get everything done. Luckily, most of my colleagues have been very supportive. And I’ve enjoyed No. 19!

Have you come across any great Labor Day sales? I know Sephora is having one; I didn’t see many fragrances that called to me, but they had great prices on some nice hair mists from Tocca and Acqua di Parma, plus some reduced prices on fragrances from those houses.

Labor Day always marks the start of fall for me, although it no longer marks the school calendar as it once did. When I was growing up, school always started right after Labor Day (and it still does, in some Northern states). In the South, school starts in August, sometimes August 1! Nevertheless, there’s something about the start of September and the Labor Day weekend that does mark the start of fall. I’m still wearing hot weather fragrances like Un Jardin Sur le Nil, but I’m gravitating more, as usual, to fragrances that have a bit more spice, depth, and even some woodiness.

We have absolutely no plans for the holiday weekend other than to unwind and relax here at home. Next week, I begin my regimen for better health. Wish me luck! And Happy Labor Day!

Image of workers, wishing Happy Labor Day
Happy Labor Day!
Perfume Chat Room, August 26

Perfume Chat Room, August 26

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, August 26, and I am choosing to focus on perfume rather than the multiple crazinesses that seem to be hovering about me this week: in the news, in my neighborhood, and at my job. Serenity now!!! Lately I’ve been regularly wearing Tzigana, a beautiful fragrance that I bought with Rosae in Florence, Italy, at Aquaflor, back in 2019. From the website:

Grapefruit and pink pepper tell the story of the first sun on the skin after a long winter. A flowery heart, the most precious absolutes of narcissus, jasmine and rose reveal themselves in their maximum splendor and seduce the sense of smell with magnetism. The impalpable sweet aftertaste reveals notes of heliotrope and vanilla, all accentuated by the unmistakable powdery touch of ambrette seeds. 

It is just lovely! I loved it when I tried it in their Florence store (which my nice husband had to find for me), but I hadn’t really been wearing it, focusing more on Rosae. But in the current state of affairs, Tzigana is both beautiful and comforting.

What are your comfort scents? Have you needed them lately?

Aquaflor Firenze
Perfume Chat Room, August 19

Perfume Chat Room, August 19

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, August 19, and here comes the rain again! Luckily the guys who come once a month to help with my yard and garden came yesterday and pulled up tons of weeds that grew like a jungle during the rainy weeks when we were in New Hampshire. I’ll be doing more of that this weekend, weather permitting!

In honor of Coco Chanel’s birthday, Now Smell This has a community project to wear a Chanel fragrance. So of course, I’m wearing Chanel No. 19, which was named for her birthdate (August 19). Double NST community points for me! And it is VERY green, which I love. No. 19 is one of my perennial (pun intended) fragrance loves. I have it in the vintage eau de toilette formulation, and it’s just wonderful.

Image from Disney’s Fantasia 2000; http://www.disney.com

How about you? Do you have a favorite Chanel fragrance? Are you being taken over by plants of any kind, fragrant or not?

Perfume Chat Room, August 12

Perfume Chat Room, August 12

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, August 12, and our summer travels are over. We had a great trip to New England to see my FIL. Along the way, we had our three kids with us on a beautiful lake for several days, saw both of my sisters and three of their kids, also saw my husband’s sister and her family, met our great-nieces for the first time when our nephew came to see my FIL with them, and met both the newish puppy and the young ocicat in my younger sister’s house. Whew! Unlike last summer, we didn’t digress to other destinations but drove straight up the Eastern seaboard, with one stop in Richmond and one in Connecticut, both on the way up and the way down.

We stayed in the most fabulous bed-and-breakfast inn in Richmond, called the Boulevard Inn. It’s a 1914 townhouse in a historic neighborhood called the “Fan” (due to its shape on a map) that is full of cute restaurants and beautiful houses. Our hosts, Mitch and Roni, couldn’t have been nicer or more hospitable. I highly recommend it!

Victorian room in bed and breakfast inn
Bon Air room in the Boulevard Inn, Richmond VA.
Streetscape in Richmond, VA, showing inn.
The Boulevard Inn, Richmond VA.

Have you been able to stay anywhere special this summer? I kind of can’t believe summer is really over, but it is. Our son moves back to campus today, and I return to the office. The weather, however, is still very hot and steamy. How about you?

Perfume Chat Room, August 5

Perfume Chat Room, August 5

Welcome to the weekly Perfume Chat Room, perfumistas! I envision this chat room as a weekly drop-in spot online, where readers may ask questions, suggest fragrances, tell others their SOTD, comment on new releases or old favorites, and respond to each other. The perennial theme is fragrance, but we can interpret that broadly. This is meant to be a kind space, so please try not to give or take offense, and let’s all agree to disagree when opinions differ. In fragrance as in life, your mileage may vary! YMMV.

Today is Friday, August 5, and I have family on my mind. This is mostly because we have gone to New Hampshire with our young adult children for the specific purpose of seeing my elderly father-in-law, who is their only remaining grandparent. We’re having a great time! We have had some fabulous weather, although today is overcast after some heavy rain last night. As hoped, we have seen and heard several loons. Their calls are so distinctive, and instantly bring back memories of past vacations in New England.

The other reason family is on my mind is that the “Scent Semantics” blogging crew, of which I am one thanks to Portia, posted this week about the word “family.” I wrote about the family of fragrances launched by one of my favorite perfumers, Liz Moores, and her independent brand Papillon Artisan Perfumes. Please check it out, as well as the other Scent Semantics blog posts!

It feels as if summer is coming to a close, and I’m not quite ready for that. How about you?

New England lake with loons
Loons on lake in Maine
Scent Semantics, August 1

Scent Semantics, August 1

The first thing that came to my mind when I learned that this month’s Scent Semantics word is “family” was not my actual family, but groupings of fragrances. I considered writing about a pillar fragrance and its flankers, but those are usually mainstream or designer fragrances and none of the available options seemed exciting this month. Then I thought about “fragrance families”, like florals, but that seemed too vast.

However, there are several small, independent perfumers who have a total number of fragrances that is quite small and manageable – like a family! So I’ve decided to discuss the fragrance family of Papillon Artisan Perfumes, founded and led by perfumer Liz Moores, in England.

Papillon’s first fragrances, launched in 2014, were the trio of Angelique, Anubis, and Tobacco Rose. I first encountered them in 2015, at the now-closed Marble Arch location of London’s Les Senteurs (the original location on Elizabeth Street is still very much open and in operation, and well worth a visit). I remember the shop assistant recommending them and telling me what a very nice person Liz Moores is! All her fragrances are eaux de parfum except for Hera, which is an extrait.

Here is what the Papillon website says about each:

Angelique:

Inspired by the astonishing beauty of the Iris Pallida flower, Angelique captures the delicate essence of a delightful Spring garden. Cascades of French mimosa, osmanthus and white champac are woven between the powdered, violet facets of precious orris. Virginian cedarwood and subtle notes of frankincense bring an ethereal light and delicate freshness to this tender composition.

Anubis:

With a name inspired by the Egyptian God of the afterlife, Anubis embodies the sacred mysteries of Ancient Egypt. Heady blooms of jasmine, amid rich suede, smoulder over an incense laden base of frankincense, sandalwood, and labdanum. Vivid slashes of immortelle, pink lotus and saffron create a perfume shrouded in darkness and veiled in mystery.

Tobacco Rose:

A sensual blend of Bulgarian rose, geranium and Rose de Mai form an opulent backdrop of velvety rose notes set against a luxuriously rich and smoky base of French hay and earthy oakmoss. Soft animalic touches of ambergris and beeswax have been suspended in a sumptuous blend of musks, creating an enigmatic, alluring and unmistakable perfume. A stunningly different interpretation of the majestic rose.

The original three fragrances were followed in 2015 by Salome and in 2017 by Dryad. Bengale Rouge was released in 2019, Spell 125 in 2021, and Hera in 2022. In that order, here are their descriptions from the brand:

Salome:

With daring doses of indolic jasmine and rich feral musks, Salome’s bedevilled and velvety animalic facets dance seductively behind a veil of Turkish rose and carnation. Vintage and honeyed, it lures with the warm, plush appeal of an erotic boudoir before ensnaring the wearer in a web of unashamed erotic delight. Slip into your second skin with Salome.

Dryad:

As vibrant emerald Galbanum weaves with the delicate flesh of Bergamot, the nomadic wanderings of Dryad begin. Beneath jade canopies, sweet-herbed Narcissus nestles with gilded Jonquil. Shadows of Apricot and Cedrat morph radiant greens to a soft golden glow. Earthed within the ochre roots of Benzoin, heady Oakmoss entwines with deep Vetiver hues. And at its heart, the slick skin of Costus beckons you further into the forest…

Bengale Rouge:

A golden fur, swathed in sandalwood and doused in honey. Sweet myrrh purrs behind a warm, rosy skin, misted with oakmoss and dappled in the rich shades of a leopard pelt. A cosy, caramel comfort glows from a gourmand heart, while sweet Tonka slinks an opulent softness upon your skin.

Spell 125:

In the Book of the dead, Spell 125 represents a balance of light and dark, life and death. The compelling ceremony of weighing the deceased’s heart against a feather animate a delicate olfactory rendering of the lightness of the soul, with just a sliver of the underworld shadows. Rise in sparkles, with the brightness of Siberian Pine. Let salt and resin lap at your skin, an ethereal cleanse, slick with wintergreen powders. A weightless shroud of lucent white ambergris lifts you. A glow of green sacra frankincense haunts you. Suspended in the lustre of ylang, you float between this world and the next.

Hera:

The goddess of weddings, family and blessings, Hera possessed a majestic power. Here, she is celebrated in the opulence of orris and jasmine. Engulfed in flowers, you are invited by a burst of orange blossom, radiating a golden halo of warm white flowers. Delicate touches reveal a buttery, rich embrace. Rose de mai brings a whisper of drama and gentle musk offers a sensual caress for Gods and Goddesses alike. A bright and beautiful perfume, steeped in energetic luxury and effortless glamour.

How do I experience these siblings? Angelique is a beautifully soft iris. No sharp edges or notes here! It embraces both the rooty and powdery facets of orris in fragrance. I smell the rootiness first, almost like fresh carrots, then the powdery aspect emerges, supported by mimosa. To my nose, mimosa is more prominent than osmanthus. Angelique just keeps getting better and better on my wrist. As of now, I only have samples of it, but a full bottle may be in my future this year, to join my full bottles of Dryad and Bengale Rouge.

Anubis is not my usual type of fragrance, but it is gorgeous! I experience it as incense-focused, with jasmine and saffron playing supporting roles. The incense chord is based on frankincense, together with sandalwood and labdanum. I think it is the labdanum that generates the impression of “suede.” Anubis is a rich, spicy, ambery fragrance, well suited to colder weather. It would be particularly appealing in autumn, I think; its warmth recalls the late afternoon sunlight and still-warm earthiness of October. It carries well, though I wouldn’t say it has huge sillage; it easily wafts from my wrist to my nose while I type.

Tobacco Rose is just what it sounds like: a smoky rose. The “tobacco” of its name is created by a blend of hay and oakmoss notes. It doesn’t smell like it is burning; it smells like tobacco leaves hanging to dry after being harvested. The smokiness is very gentle; and it is less a smell of actual smoke than it is the suggestion of smoke that is inherent in dried tobacco. As it dries down, the rose recedes for a while; and the geranium becomes the more dominant floral note, to my nose; then the rose returns. This dance between rose and geranium, against a backdrop of dried hay/tobacco, is very appealing.

Oh my! When I first sniff Salome on my wrist, my brain immediately says “skank!”, due to notes of hyrax and castoreum that announce themselves right away. I’m not into animalic fragrances, though I can appreciate them as creative works, so Salome‘s opening is somewhat off-putting. I’m happy to note, though, that after only about ten minutes, it calms down and becomes softer and more floral, with a really nice carnation note (I love carnation scents). I can still smell hints of the animalic notes, but they are now in the background, where I prefer them to be. The drydown is lovely, sensual and warm.

Be still, my heart! Dryad is a major perfume love for me, as I’ve written before. It is as green as a fragrance can get, with a strong dose of galbanum, which I happen to love. If you don’t like strong greens such as Chanel’s No. 19 or Balmain’s Vent Vert, make sure you try before you buy! But do try it — it is spectacularly beautiful, to my nose, and a true work of perfumery art. Its notes include several aromatic herbs such as Clary sage, thyme, and lavender; its structure is that of a classic chypre. After its powerful opening, it softens and it does not have the edginess I find in my beloved No. 19.

Bengale Rouge was inspired by perfumer Liz Moores’ own Bengal cat, Mimi. Like Ms. Moores’ other fragrances, it is a clever combination of notes and references to create a very specific impression. Here, she brings out the slightly animalic facets of honey to evoke the soft, warm fur of a feline that is domesticated — but not entirely. Bengal cats are said to make very appealing pets if their owner can accommodate their high energy, intelligence, and playfulness. Their coats strongly resemble the small wild cats from which they are descended, such as the Asian leopard cat. Bengale Rouge is warm, sweet in the way that honey is sweet; floral in the way that honey can be floral. It is just beautiful, and lovely to wear in the winter.

Group of Bengal cats
Bengal cats; image from vetstreet.com

I haven’t yet tried Spell 125 or Hera, Papillon’s latest offerings, though I look forward to doing so. Hera was just released, as Ms. Moores first created it as a custom wedding fragrance for her daughter Jasmine, then delayed its release to the public by a year. Have you tried either of them, or any other Papillon fragrances? What do you think of them?

Please go read the posts by my fellow Scent Semantics bloggers; you will find their links here.