Scent Sample Sunday: Tiffany & Co. Intense

Scent Sample Sunday: Tiffany & Co. Intense

Last Christmas, my husband surprised me with a bottle of 2017’s new Tiffany & Co. eau de parfum, and I loved it! I have been on something of an iris kick for a while, and Tiffany & Co. is mainly an iris scent, brightened by a citrusy opening and softened by a musk base. The only notes listed on the Tiffany website are: top — “vert de mandarine”, middle — noble iris, and base — patchouli and musk. Fragrantica lists its notes as follows: top notes are mandarin orange, bergamot and lemon; middle notes are iris, black currant, peach and rose; base notes are patchouli and musk.

Bottle of Tiffany & Co. eau de parfum with jewelry

Tiffany & Co. eau de parfum; http://www.tiffany.com

2018 has brought a new version, and it is one of those fragrances that save the good name of “flankers”, as I think it is an improvement on an already excellent original: Tiffany & Co. Intense. Again, the Tiffany website lists fewer notes: top note: vert de mandarine and pink peppercorn; heart: noble iris; base notes: amber and benzoin. Although Fragrantica doesn’t provide a separate list of notes, its graphic shows the following: top — pear, mandarin leaf, pink pepper; heart — iris, jasmine, rose; base — amber, benzoin, musk, carrot, cashmeran, and vanilla.

Blue bottle of Tiffany & Co. Intense eau de parfum, 2018.

Tiffany & Co. Intense eau de parfum; http://www.tiffany.com

The opening is a pleasantly citrusy burst of light green, which lasts only minutes until the iris takes center stage. The iris remains strong throughout the scent’s progression, which I enjoy. Good thing I do, because this flanker lasts a long time! Although it becomes more of a skin scent after a few hours, I can still easily smell it on my wrist several hours after application, and the base that remains is delicious: a warm, musky floral.

The nose behind both fragrances is Daniela Andrier, who knows her iris: she was the creator of Prada’s Infusion d’Iris and its many flankers. I found a fascinating article on a marketing website about Tiffany’s strategy and brief: Brandwatch: Tiffany & Co. Intense. Much of the story begins with the launch of Tiffany & Co. in 2017:

To understand Intense, it’s necessary to view it in the context of the original 2017 launch. This saw a completely new approach to the category for the famed US jewellery house, which sought not simply to put its name to a product, but to create a perfume that was as much a part of the brand (and a reflection of it) as any of its diamond rings.

Every element of the product – from the packaging to the ingredients – was to be inspired by the history and heritage of Tiffany.

From the very beginning, every element of The Fragrance was chosen for its intrinsic ‘Tiffany-ness’, from what the scent reflects to what it contains, to the flacon and the box that contains it, and of course the name itself. Tiffany knows its brand, and both the debut and follow-up fragrances are authentically Tiffany.

Apparently, the brief was to create “a fragrance that would evoke the touch of jewellery on bare skin; a scent (and sensation) that Tiffany no doubt knows well.” Weaving both fragrances around a strong presence of iris was a brilliant choice. As the article notes:

Tiffany has a long association with the iris, says the brand, noting the flower’s appearance in some of the house’s earliest sketches. In 1900, Tiffany won the grand prize at the Paris Exposition with an iris-shaped brooch, and the motif has continued to be a frequent reference in the century since.

The founder of Tiffany & Co., Louis Comfort Tiffany, was not only a brilliant jeweler but one of the greatest creators of stained glass in the world. Iris flowers blossomed in some of his most iconic images, such as this portion of the great “Magnolias and Irises” window he created as a memorial to the Frank family of New York. It was originally installed in a mausoleum of a Brooklyn cemetery but now resides at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Memorial stained glass window, 1908, Louis Comfort Tiffany; Magnolias and Irises, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Stained glass window, Louis Comfort Tiffany; Magnolias and Irises, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This view of the window perfectly captures Tiffany & Co. Intense. It retains the cool blues of the original fragrance’s iris notes, but deepens them and adds the warmth of amber and benzoin, evoking the soft sunset shading into twilight that the Tiffany studio captured so brilliantly in stained glass. Or is it dawn? Only the artist knows.

The bottle for both Tiffany & Co. and Tiffany & Co. Intense is gorgeous. The Brandwatch article describes it:

Diamonds proved the perfect inspiration for the flacon of a house world-famous for its work with such stones. The base of the bottle features faceting inspired by the Tiffany Diamond, one of the largest yellow diamonds ever discovered. The shoulders recall the geometric lines of the Lucida diamond, a signature cut of the house that adorns many solitaire engagement rings.

The first fragrance’s bottle was clear, with a “Tiffany blue” collar. As beautiful as it is, the new bottle is even more gorgeous — its glass is itself “Tiffany blue” and the collar is silver, another material for which Tiffany & Co. is famous, especially in its long collaboration with designer Elsa Peretti, whose designs in sterling silver have become as iconic as the founder’s stained glass. Needless to say, both fragrances come in the legendary Tiffany blue gift box; their packaging is lined in silver. So, so pretty!

Blue bottle of Tiffany & Co. Intense eau de parfum

Tiffany & Co. Intense; http://www.tiffany.com

Every aspect of these fragrances and their launches has been carefully considered and rendered as beautifully as possible, from the creation of the iris butter — said to be “an extraction method exclusive to Tiffany”, in which French-grown blooms were chosen and harvested only in July and August, to the ad campaign using a cover of one of the Beatles’ most famous songs as its soundtrack:

One final, perfect detail: the Tiffany website includes a special link on each product page to “Drop A Hint.” Genius! You click on the link, choose one of a few designs, fill in the email for the intended recipient, and this is what s/he gets, with a link to the desired item:

Tiffany Drop A Hint ecard

TIffany’s “Drop A Hint”; http://www.tiffany.com

Subtle, right? Honey, if you’re reading this …

Readers, what’s on your holiday wish list? Have you dropped any hints?

May Muguet Marathon: Miu Miu

May Muguet Marathon: Miu Miu

Fashion house Miu Miu launched its first fragrance in 2015, Miu Miu. According to Fragrantica, it was meant to emphasize lily of the valley:

The composition of the fragrance is signed by perfumer Daniela Roche Andrier, known for her creations for the house of Prada (as well as Bvlgari, Marni, Bottega Veneta). As Danielle explains it, the focus is on lily of the valley flowers supported with floral notes of jasmine, rose and green notes, as well as a special ingredient created by Givaudan, akigalawood, which develops the scent of patchouli, notes of pepper and woody aromas of oud. The composition of Miu Miu fragrance opens in a fresh and floral manner, and as it develops it begins warmer and woodsier, says Danielle.

I was disappointed when I tried it, though I liked it, because to me the lily of the valley note was not evident enough. Miu Miu felt to me like a pretty, greenish floral, but I really didn’t experience it as a muguet-centric fragrance, in spite of the stated focus and the promotional materials featuring a gorgeous lily of the valley textile design.

Bottle of Miu Miu fragrance and lily of the valley textile

Miu Miu fragrance; image from http://www.internetwhatever.com

Next came Miu Miu L’Eau Bleue, in 2017. Ah, that’s more like it! The dewy greenness of this flanker correlates better, to my nose, to lily of the valley. The fragrance reads as crisper and greener than the original. Also, I greatly prefer L’Eau Bleue’s bottle over the first Miu Miu — the clear turquoise glass and light yellow top really appeal to me, and the brightness of the clear blue glass matches the brightness and transparency of this fragrance. It is a happy, cheerful, spring-into-summer fragrance. Later in the summer heat, I will probably want Un Jardin Sur le Nil, which is marvelous in really hot weather, but for spring and early summer, L’Eau Bleue is a lovely choice. Perfumer Daniela Andrier clearly has a way with floral notes; when I looked her up on Fragrantica, I was surprised to see how many of her creations I know and like, including many she did for Prada, like the marvelous Infusion d’Iris and dozens of others. (Ms. Andrier was also the perfumer behind Tiffany’s new fragrance, Tiffany & Co., an elegant floral scent launched in 2017 and a new favorite of mine).

Fragrance ad for Miu Miu L'Eau Bleue, with bottle and kitten

Miu Miu L’Eau Bleue; image from http://www.store.miumiu.com.

And now comes Miu Miu L’Eau Rosee. Yes, as the name suggests, it is pink. The muguet heart note is joined by peony and rose, as well as peach and pear, and this third flanker is more of a fruity floral than the first two scents. It isn’t sugary or sweet, though, and it has a pleasant gingery, spicy, light woodiness to its drydown, which lingers for several hours after first application. Like the other Miu Mius, it has a playfulness and sprightliness that is youthful and appealing.

Bottle of Miu Miu L'Eau Rosee fragrance with kitten

Miu Miu L’Eau Rosee

The lily of the valley note is present, albeit one created by hints of gardenia, tuberose, jasmine, and honeysuckle, according to the notes listed on the Miu Miu website, but the pink peony note is the most dominant. They blend well together, and this flanker retains the dewiness of its predecessor. It is also an appealing option for spring and summer, but if you really want muguet, you should look to L’Eau Bleue or some of the other fragrances in this May Muguet Marathon. Have you tried the original Miu Miu or either of its flankers? What did you think?